The Most Dangerous Thing

To borrow an observation from Comocean’s blog, the most dangerous thing on a boat is a schedule.  I’ll get Rick to post later and explain more fully the decision-making process.  But if you’re looking at the map (https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=zWTatK5H0KOI.ktTzzEm2Z3Kw), it’s obvious that the original plans to (a) get to Norfolk from Annapolis in a single run, and (b) include a long offshore run from North Carolina to Charleston, have been scuttled.   Due to the weather and sea conditions, a less ambitious routing is now in place.

Michael left Calypso in the Norfolk area, but a day later than planned.  Daylight in Norfolk allowed the crew a better look at the activity in the area of one of the world’s largest naval facilities.

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We occasionally — once every couple of years — spot a submarine in the shipping channel off Annapolis, but I gather sightings like this are far more common in Norfolk.  (Photo pilfered from Michael’s Facebook page.)

Now it’s just Rick and Skip piloting Calypso through the ICW, with the additional crew who would have joined in North Carolina for an offshore leg being excused.  I’m insanely jealous, because exploring the ICW has long been a wish of mine.  However, for this sabbatical, we decided to forego a leisurely meander down the waterway in order to maximize our time in the islands.  Rick are Skip are making a more purposeful trip down the ICW, but you still get to see a lot when you’re only going 7 knots.

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If you’ve spent beach vacations in the Outer Banks, this is what the backside looks like in autumn.  This view is abeam of the Corolla/Duck area.

When Rick and I originally planned to make this journey (which would have been in 2004), it was an altogether different world, technologically speaking.  At that point, I had just been issued that most-advanced handheld communication device: a Treo.  Being in touch with home base would have involved much more complicated machinations.  These days, at least while in the U.S., being plugged in is much simpler.

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The outlets near the nav station are filled with chargers.  Gotta keep the iPhones, iPads and iPods powered up.  (Another photo pilfered from Michael.)

Of course, all of those devices work only where there is a reliable cellular network and/or WiFi.  As we get deeper into the Bahamas, if we can’t voluntarily unplug ourselves, it will be done for us….

P.S.  The boys confessed to breaking into the Pop-Tarts this morning.  Even though I got the wrong flavor.

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